Best Pulse Oximeter

We will review the top 7 over the counter pulse oximeters available to you and I today.  Each oximeter was reviewed for accuracy, alarm options, display readability battery life, and special features that may help you. We will also provide you with some general guidelines on what to look for in an oximeter, how they work, what their limitations are,  and what is common between them all.
pulse oximeter

As a registered nurse providing direct care for seniors in my community for over 10 years I have found the use of a good finger pulse oximeter to be almost as valuable as my stethoscope.   The information provided by one of these little devices, when combined with what your feeling and seeing, can literally save your life, or the life of a loved one.

A good finger pulse oximeter will quickly, and accurately show you both your heart rate (pulse) and the oxygen saturation of the blood in your finger.  More importantly, a good finger pulse oximeter will also show you CHANGES in your heart rate and/or oxygen saturation over time which is ultimately what you need to know.

So, how can you make sure that the product you purchase will meet your specific needs?

And, once you get one, how can you make sure that what you are reading on the device is correct?

In this post we will review the top 7 over the counter pulse oximeters (there are medical grade prescription pulse oximeters) available to you and I today.  Each oximeter was reviewed for accuracy, alarm options, display readability, battery life, and special features that may help you.

We will also provide you with some general guidelines on what to look for in an oximeter, how they work, what their limitations are,  and what is common between them all.

But first, take a quick peek at the finger tip pulse oximeters as well as a few specialty oximeters we reviewed to help you see which one is right for you.

The Short Story:

  1. Innovo Delux Fingertip Oximeter: Ideal for those who like a visual indicator that they are using the device properly and who need a high level of accuracy with alarms to notify you of heart rates or oxygen readings outside of your specifically set high or low personal parameters.
  2. Facelake  FL-100 Fingertip Pulse Oximeter – Ideal for those who need to monitor if their heart rate or oxygen levels are outside of your specifically set high or low personal parameters.   This oximeter is also good for outdoor use as the screen can be read in sunlight.
  3.  Zaccurate Pro Series 500DL Fingertip Oximeter (optional upgrade to 500D): Ideal for those with very small fingers as it has a self adjusting finger chamber.   They are also known for having better customer service than most of their competition.
  4. Santamedical generation 2 Fingertip Pulse Oximeter:  Ideal for those who need a super bright easy to read display screen and do not want a lot of other bells and whistles.
  5. ChoiceMMed Real Person Reading Fingertip Pulse Oximeter: Ideal for those who are visually impaired or blind as the device will read aloud your heart rate and oxygen levels.
  6. Wrist Pulse Oximeter Heart Rate Monitor by Innovo:  Ideal for those who need to see  and track what their oxygen and or heart rate are doing over a longer period of time and need to be audibly notified of results that are outside of their personal parameters. Software only works with PC, not Mac or phones as this time.
  7. BodiMetrics Sleep and Fitness Monitor (for the wrist):  Also ideal for those who need to see and track what their oxygen and or heart rate are doing over a longer period of time BUT need or want to do so via their mobile Android or iOS device and who are OK with a vibration notification of heart rate or oxygen values outside of their personal parameters.

What Do These Oximeters Have in Common?

Before you spend lots of time looking at fingertip oximeters comparing cost, ease of operation,battery life, and what accessories they come with.   Please note that most oximeters have the following features in common.

  1. over the counter fingertip pulse oximeters cost about $20-30.
  2. come with batteries (usually AAA), and lanyard, and often a small carrying case.
  3. batteries typically last 30-40 hours and most have battery life indicators on their displays.
  4. there is a single button on the device to turn it on, rotate screen, etc.
  5. multi-directional screen viewing options are very common
  6. the device will automatically shut-off anywhere from 5-15 seconds after removing your finger from it.

pulse monitor

How Your Pulse Oximeter Works:

The mechanism for how a pulse oximeter works is fairly complicated.   However, the short version is that your pulse oximeter probe emits 2 wavelengths of light (red and infrared) through the fairly translucent skin of your finger into a photo-detector on the other side of the probe which measures the changing absorbance at each wavelength as it passes through the blood vessels in your finger.

The molecule that holds/binds oxygen in your blood is called hemoglobin.    In short, how much light is absorbed or passed through the hemoglobin determines your blood oxygen level. The probes sensors also detect the pulsing movement of your fingers blood vessels which provides you with your pulse reading.

When and Who Should Have a Pulse Oximeter:

Although most over the counter pulse oximeters are marketed for sports enthusiasts, pilots, and mountain climbers, when you look at the reviews, questions, and feedback on the oximeters you will see that nearly  all of the people talking about them are using them because they have a personal health concern.

You will benefit from owning and knowing how to use your own pulse oximeter if you have a medical condition that effects your body’s blood oxygen levels, such as heart failure, sleep apnea, COPD, chronic lung disease, anemia, lung cancer, asthma or pneumonia. If you have one or more of theses conditions you are at risk for not getting enough oxygen.

You may also need to monitor blood oxygen levels during physical activity, after surgery, or if you end up with a cold/respiratory illness when you also have one of the above mentioned health concerns.

how much oxygen is in your lungs?

How To Know if You Are Not Getting Enough Oxygen:

The following is a list of symptoms you may experience if you are not getting enough oxygen in your body.   These are also some of the things to look for when you are trying to determine if your pulse oximeter is reading correctly.

  • Wheezing
  • Frequent cough
  • Choking sensation
  • Waking up out of breath
  • Bluish discoloration of the skin
  • Shortness of breath while resting
  • Severe shortness of breath after physical activity

If you are feeling any of these things and your pulse oximeter is consistently reading low oxygen levels for you, contact your healthcare provider right away, or put in place the treatment plan that he or she has given you especially for when your oxygen drops (for example a nebulizer/breathing treatment, or supplemental oxygen).

If you do not have a home treatment plan contact your healthcare provider and focus on staying calm while you wait for help.  Focus on taking as full of breaths as you can.  Lean forward with your elbows on a table to help open up your lungs.  Many people also find “pursed Lip Breathing” to help when they feel like they can’t get enough air.   This breathing technique is best illustrated as: Breath in through your nose like you are smelling a flower and breath out through your mouth just like when you blow out a candle.

What happens if your have low blood oxygen levels for a long time?

We all know we need oxygen to live, and without it we will die.   Oxygen is essential to every organ and part of our body.   Without the proper level of oxygen in our bodies literally every part of us can be harmed.

But did you know that having chronically low oxygen levels can hurt you even if you don’t realize you aren’t getting enough oxygen?  Below is a small sampling of what happens especially when you don’t have enough oxygen over a long period of time.

  1. The Brain: uses about 25% of your bodies oxygen.  If it doesn’t get enough you may experience a decrease in your thinking ability, decision making, and even coordination.
  2. Heart and Lungs: Low oxygen levels can lead to high blood pressure from constricted vessels in the lungs that your heart now has to work harder to pump blood through.
  3. Liver and Kidneys : When they don’t get enough oxygen they are not able to filter toxins as well which may result in swelling/edema to your lower extremities.
  4. Your Extremities:  may feel cold and have a bluish tint to the skin because they are not receiving enough oxygen.

Click here to learn more about how low oxygen levels effect your body and what you can do to help improve your oxygen levels

pulse oximeter

What a Pulse Oximeter Actually Does:

All pulse oximeters measure your heart rate (pulse) and also the amount of oxygenated hemoglobin in the blood supply (often called your oxygen saturation, 02 sat, or SpO2). This helps give you an idea if you are getting enough oxygen for your body to operate properly.

Just like checking your blood pressure or temperature, these measurements help to paint a picture of how your overall health is doing.   Understanding these readings and what is normal for you can help you better understand and control your own health.

You should consider taking your pulse oximeter with you to your health care providers office to compare readings.    Most oximeters (including medical grade ones) have a +/- 1-2% variance level for both their pulse and oxygen saturation readings.  So, if your pulse oximeter always reads 93% when your providers reads 95%, that’s OK.   What you want to see is consistency over time.   You want to be able to tell when something is changing, and so does your provider.

But, before you really start using one of these devices you should know what a normal pulse rate and ideal oxygen saturation level is for you.   Ask your healthcare provider if you don’t know. This is EXTREMELY IMPORTANT as the primary purpose and function of any pulse oximeter is to monitor for changes.   You can’t accurately know if something has changed if you don’t know what it was, or should be, to start with.

This is also important because there are certain lung conditions and disorders where too much oxygen can even hurt you.   However, if you are a senior and you do not have a lung or breathing problem, you do not smoke or live with a smoker,  and you are relatively healthy, your resting pulse rate should be around 60-80 and your oxygen saturation level at least 92% or higher.

What your oximeter can tell you then is if your pulse is normal for you, or if it is going faster (a normal result if you are breathing harder/faster than usual such as with hard labor or exercise) or slower (sometimes a medication side effect for example) than your normal.

The oximeter will also tell you if your oxygen saturation levels are normal for you or if they are dropping below your normal level (perhaps you are feeling short of breath or have a respiratory virus for example) or if your oxygen saturation is going above your normal level (if you increased your supplemental oxygen from 2 to 4 liters per minute for example).

What Your Pulse Oximeter Can Not Do:

Your pulse oximeter is not able to tell you if there is something clinically wrong such as if you are having a heart attack or stroke.   What it can tell you is if your pulse and oxygen saturation level change as they very well may under these circumstances.

This is why the readings on your pulse oximeter should always be interpreted in combination with what else you are seeing and feeling. NEVER JUST LOOK AT THE NUMBERS!  This is true of any medical instrument.   User error, biological changes, or even faulty equipment can and do give false readings sometimes.   You can not simply rely on the device to tell you what is going on.  Use common sense and let the device help you fill in the missing pieces.

Caution!

Limitations and Causes of Inaccurate Readings on Your Pulse Oximeter:

These are the most common reasons why your pulse oximeter may not read correctly.   See  additional information on pulse oximeter limitations for further reading.

COLD HANDS:

When you are cold your blood vessels naturally constrict and pull away from the surface of your skin.   This decreases the perfusion in your fingers and can make your pulse hard to read.   Your oximeter will not work well if your hands are cold.

NAIL POLISH, ARTIFICIAL NAILS, AND THICK FUNGUS LIKE NAILS:

Thick, colored, or artificial nails obscure your pulse oximeters ability to “See” your blood and give you and accurate reading.

SMOKING!

Being a regular smoker or living with a regular smoker can significantly impact your pulse oximeter’s readings of your oxygen saturation.   When you smoke, part of what you inhale is carbon monoxide.  Your pulse oximeter  cannot distinguish between oxygen and carbon monoxide in the blood as both molecules bind to hemoglobin.  Therefore, if you are a regular smoker, your oxygen saturation levels will typically be artificially HIGH.

SEVERE ANEMIA OR LOW BLOOD VOLUME:

If you do not have enough perfusion (amount of blood moving through the blood vessels) where the oximeter is trying to read then your results may also be artificially HIGH.   The pulse oximeter reading is a percentage of hemoglobin saturated.  It does not tell you how much hemoglobin you have.  Thus although the hemoglobin you have may be well saturated with oxygen, if you do not have enough hemoglobin then your body is still not getting the amount of oxygen it needs.

PARKINSON’S:

If you are unable to keep your finger still (such as with Parkinson’s Disease) long enough for your oximeter to provide you with an accurate reading your pulse and oxygen saturation readings may very widely.   Although over the counter and medical grade oximeter manufactures have been working hard to decrease the effect of motion on their devices, this is still a concern.   To best make sure that your reading is accurate, first make sure the pulse is showing steady and regular, or better yet, check your pulse on your wrist manually and compare it to the reading on your oximeter.  If they match, great.  Otherwise, don’t trust the oxygen saturation either.

instructions

How to Use your Pulse Oximeter:

First, make sure to read the info sheet or Manual for your particular oximeter.  Although they seem very easy to use (and they are) some of them have very unique guidelines, such as only using fingers on your right hand.  Check this first.

Second, make sure that the your fingertip pulse oximeter fits your finger.  It should fit snugly and securely on your finger without feeling tight or loose.    If the chamber is over expanded by too large of a finger it may let too much ambient light into the device and make the reading inaccurate.  Likewise, if your finger is too small the probe may also sense surrounding light or darkness and not give you an accurate reading.

For the best results, make sure that your finger is clean and warm ( no sticky candy residue, dirt from gardening, or even sweat from exercising).  Wash your hands or use an alcohol wipe if you need to.   Rub your hands together vigorously and move them around to help warm them up if they are cold.  Your oximeter can’t read cold or dirty hands well.

If low oxygen is a medical risk for you, you also need to make sure that at least one of your finger nails is clear of polish or artificial nails.  Some pulse oximeters say they can read through nail polish.  However, as a nurse who has used many medical grade and over the counter oximeters over the years, I have personally experienced the fear when you place that pulse oximeter on a sick patient’s  darkly polished nail and just pray it works.  Because, when you really need that reading to be right, you don’t want to be worrying about the nail polish altering it.   So, if you like your nails pretty, great.  Just leave one nail clear.  You will be more confident in what you are reading and your emergency healthcare team will thank you too.

Finally, keep your hand still while you are taking a reading with your oximeter.   Oximeters are getting better at detecting accidental movement but they’re not perfect yet and hand movement can alter their readings.   Keep still and wait for the pulse displayed on your device to be stable, then read the oxygen saturation.

How to Read Your Pulse Oximeter:

Remember that neither your pulse or your oxegen saturation change instantly when something happens or changes in their environment.  So, your pulse oximeter reading is always playing catch up.  You will need to give your oximeter at least 30-60 seconds to begin to register changes you may have made that could effect your pulse and oxygen levels.

For example, if your phone rings and you get up quickly from your chair and run across the room to grab it, by the time you get to the phone you may suddenly feel a little light headed and short of breath.  If you  immediately take a reading with your pulse oximeter, it can look like your usual rested reading for 30 seconds or so before it shows your pulse rate go up and your oxygen level go down from you exertion of running across the room.

Then again, if you stop, relax, and practice deep breathing exercises for a minute it will also take about 30 seconds  before you see your pulse slow and your oxygen saturation climbing back up again.

In order to get an accurate oxygen saturation reading, your pulse oximeter has to sense every beat of a fairly strong pulse and good blood perfusion to the area it is trying to read (your finger).  So, if your pulse is irregular, weak or there is not enough blood flow for some reason, the pulse oximeter may show an oxygen reading, but it is not necessarily accurate.

So, if you see an oxygen saturation reading but no pulse reading, don’t trust it.   Readjust and wait for a strong pulse reading.

Ideally, your pulse oximater should show a strong, regular pulse when you are at rest. If your pulse is higher than usual, but the oxygen saturation number is normal, it means that your heart is working harder to keep your oxygen saturation up where it should be, which could indicate a problem if it remains that way on subsequent readings.

Likewise, if your pulse oximeter shows your pulse is high and the oxygen saturation reading is low while you are at rest,  it could also indicate a problem if it remains that way on subsequent readings.

The important thing is to not panic! First, check how you are feeling and what you are seeing.  Ask yourself, “Do these things match what the readings on my oximeter are telling me?”  Now, wait a few minutes, and take another reading. If the abnormal readings continue, and you are feeling out of breath,  or other signs that you are not getting enough oxygen, contact your healthcare provider.

weighing your health options

Weighing the Details on the Best Fingertip Pulse Oximeters:

Below you will find more information on the top 5 over the counter fingertip pulse oximeters.  Each of them have been reviewed for accuracy, alarm options, display readability, battery life, and special features that may help you.   We will also take a look at 2 wrist oximeters that are commonly used for monitoring oxygen saturation levels for longer periods of time, such as when you want to share with your doctor what your oxygen levels are doing while you sleep.

Please keep in mind that this section does not include features that are common between all of the oximeters.   Please see our “What do these Oximeters Have in Common” section.

Innovo Delux Fingertip Oximeter

The two most unique features associated with this fingertip pulse oximeter are its perfusion index and pulse graph technology that helps you to know if the device is getting a good reading, and the high and low alarm features.

Pros:

  1. Accuracy: +/- 2%  for both pulse and oxygen saturation and able to correct for small movements to increase accuracy of readings.
  2. Alarm options: you can set both high and low alarms per your preference for pulse or oxygen saturation levels.   This way you can make sure you both hear and see if your levels are higher or lower than your healthcare provider has indicated are good for you.
  3. Unique features:  First the Perfusion Index (PI)which you will see on your display screen and ranges from 0.1-10.  This is a measurement of how strong your pulse is.  If the reading is 0.2 or less you will not get a good reading due to your fingers being too cold or improperly placed in the device.   Secondly, there is a graph of your pulse on your display screen as well.  This is called the Plethysmograph or the SpO2 Waveform.  The relative height of this graph also gives you an indication of how much blood the oximeter is detecting in your blood vessels with each beat of your heart which is another way to help see how strong your pulse is.  This is is important because without a strong pulse you will not get an accurate oxygen saturation reading.   When both the PII range is greater than 0.2 and you see a strong regular rhythm on the graph, then you know your oximeter is positioned correctly and the oxygen saturation readings you are seeing are correct.   This really helps take the guessing out of your oximeter readings.

Cons:

  1. No data storing or long term recording options to tracks what your pulse or oxygen saturation are doing while you sleep for example.
  2. Does not interface with any smartphone or computer software  so you can print reports to share with your healthcare provider for example.
  3. Does NOT fit very small fingers.

Best For:

The Innovo Delux fingertip oximeter is ideal for those who like a visual indicator that they are using the device properly and who need a high level of accuracy with alarms to notify you of heart rates or oxygen readings outside of your specifically set high or low personal parameters.

Facelake  FL-100 Fingertip Pulse Oximeter – Blood Oxygen Monitor with Alarm & Case

This oximeter costs less than the Innovo while maintaining the user controlled high and low alarms features for both pulse rate and oxygen saturation. However, it does not have the perfusion index or pulse wavelength graph to help you know that the device is reading properly.

Pros:

  1. Cost: lower cost while maintaining  audible alarm options
  2. Alarm options:   you can set both high and low alarms per their preference for pulse or oxygen saturation levels.   This way you can make sure you both hear and see if your levels are higher or lower than your healthcare provider has indicated are good for you.
  3. Unique Features:  4 way multi-directional display visible in bright light and sunlight.

Cons:

  1. No built in indicators to help you know that the device is getting an accurate reading.
  2. No data storing or long term recording options to tracks what your pulse or oxygen saturation are doing while you sleep for example.
  3. Does not interface with any smartphone or computer software  so you can print reports to share with your healthcare provider for example.

Best For:

The Facelake  FL-100 Fingertip Pulse Oximeter is a lower cost option that is ideal for those who need to monitor if their heart rate or oxygen levels are outside of your specifically set high or low personal parameters.   This oximeter is also good for outdoor use as the screen can be read in sunlight.

Zaccurate Pro Series 500DL and 500D  

One of the best advantages of this fingertip oximeter is its self adjusting finger chamber that allows for nearly all sizes of fingers to work in the device(even tiny ladies hands).  This is also the only oximeter noted on the over the counter market that reads to 100% oxygen saturation (others go to 99%) and it is also listed as being manufactured to FDA pulse oximeter reading standards.  

Pros:

  1. Customer Service:  The actual manufacturer is Beyond Med Shop, US based with US based tech support available.   Noted for good customer service compared to other brands reviewed.
  2. Accuracy: the only over the counter fingertip pulse oximeter that will read your oxygen saturation up to 100% in 10 seconds.
  3. Unique Features:  include a specialized self adjusting finger chamber accommodates a wider variety of finger sizes including children so would fit the hands of a very small adult.

Cons:

  1. No display screen rotation available for this model which makes it more difficult to read the results.
  2. No built in indicators to help you know that the device is getting an accurate reading.
  3. No long term recording or interface with computer or smart phone options for you to digitally track your readings while you sleep for example.

Upgrade available:  For just a few dollars more you can upgrade to the Zaccurate Pro Series 500D.  This device includes a multi-directional rotating screen, pulse strength graph and alarm options the the 500DL series does not offer.   However, there are questions about this model’s accuracy with the pulse graph and the alarms do not have as many user setting options as other pulse oximeters discussed in this post.

Best For:

The Zaccurate Pro-Series 500D/500DL fingertip oximeter is ideal for those with very small fingers as it has a self adjusting finger chamber.   They are also known for having better customer service than most of their competition.

Santamedical Generation 2 

This is a basic, low cost oximeter option with a very bright, easy to read screen and no confusing bells or whistles.

Pros:

  1. Accuracy: +/- 2% for both pulse and oxygen saturation
  2. Display rotation: multi-direction 6 way screen viewing
  3. Unique features: This oximeter has a super bright easy to read screen.

Cons:

  1. No built in indicators to help you know that the device is getting an accurate reading.
  2. No alarm options to help you know  if your pulse or oxygen saturation levels are higher or lower than your healthcare provider has indicated are good for you.
  3. No long term recording or interface with computer or smart phone options for you to digitally track your readings while you sleep for example.

Best for: 

The Santamedical generation 2 Fingertip Pulse Oximeter is ideal for those who need a super bright easy to read display screen and do not want a lot of other bells and whistles.

ChoiceMMed Real Person Reading Fingertip Pulse Oximeter

This was the only talking pulse oximeter we found offering an all around user friendly device for visually impaired or blind individuals.

Pros:

  1. Auditory Features: This oximeter beeps when its reading is available and provides auditory read out of both your pulse and oxygen saturation.  It even has an audible alarm to notify you if the battery is running low.
  2. Display Readability:  Comes with a 2 way display that is large, bright, and easy to read
  3. Battery Compartment: designed to make it easier to install new batteries when it’s hard for you to see.

Cons:

  1. There is no visual or auditory indicators to help you determine if the device is getting an accurate reading.
  2. There are no high or low pulse or oxygen saturation alarms to alert you that these levels may be outside of the parameters your Healthcare Provider has indicated are good for you.
  3. No long term recording or interface with computer or smart phone options for you to digitally track your readings while you sleep for example.

Best For:

The ChoiceMMed Real Person Reading Fingertip Pulse Oximeter is deal for those who are visually impaired or blind as the device will read aloud your heart rate and oxygen levels.

record and analyze your health

Long Term Pulse Oximeter Monitoring:

With any of the above mentioned pulse oximeters you can keep the device secure and still on your finger for 5 minutes or so while you are watching it to see if there is a desired change (such as if you just did some deep breathing exercises or used your inhaler when you were short of breath).

But what about instances when you want to be able to track and record what your pulse or oxygen saturation are doing over a longer period of time: such as when you or your healthcare provider need to know how often your oxygen saturation dips below a certain number when you sleep.

Here, we will also take a look at 2 wrist oximeters that are commonly used for monitoring oxygen saturation levels for longer periods of time.  Neither manufacturer has their devices working perfectly and reviews of these products do have concerns about durability and accuracy under certain circumstances.

BodiMetrics Sleep and Fitness Monitor

This wrist oximeter operates with a small thumb ring probe connected via a thin cable to a wrist band.  It includes a free app for storing and tracking data compatible with Andriod or iOS phones.  This software provides multiple graph and display options to help you and your healthcare provider see what your pulse and oxygen saturation readings were doing over time.

Many reviews expressed concern that the device is not durable, the battery does not last through the night, and with the manufacture who does not appear to have good customer service.

The device does have vibrations to wake you up if your pre-set oxygen saturation level is out of range but there is no audible alarm and the vibration is not really strong so this won’t alert a caregiver or necessarily wake you up either.  It also has a built in pedometer to measure your walking and will send you reminders to walk more to meet your step goals.

Bluetooth-Enabled 50F Plus Wrist Pulse Oximeter Heart Rate Monitor

This wrist oximeter is manufactured by Innovo, and also consists of a wrist band (with display screen) and a finger probe to record your pulse and oxygen saturation.   It comes with free software for your PC.   This software is not compatible with phones or Mac computers at this time.  The recorded data on this software comes with multiple display options and can be printed out to share results with your healthcare provider.

This device has both an auditory and visual alarm (although the alarm is somewhat quiet per reviews) to notify you if your pre-set high or low pulse or oxygen saturation values are outside  your personal parameters.

Many reviews of this device indicate that the probe is very sensitive and does not read well with a lot of movement.  Thus you may not get good data if you are a restless sleeper and it certainly won’t work well if you are trying to monitor readings while you are awake and moving about.

the bottom line

The Bottom Line:

If you are a senior with any medical condition that effects your body’s blood oxygen levels, such as heart failure, sleep apnea, COPD, chronic lung disease, anemia, lung cancer, asthma or pneumonia you need your own pulse oximeter.

When you know how to read the data on these devices you will be able to breath easier just knowing that you can actually tell whats going on with your body.  That knowledge will help you decide what to do next and when you really do need to call your healthcare provider.

All of the devices reviewed in this post are top of the line over the counter products.  For basic spot checking or short term monitoring of your pulse and oxygen saturation a fingertip pulse oximeter will be your best bet.   If you need to see what is happening with your pulse or oxygen saturation over longer periods of time, a wrist style pulse oximeter with recording software will be your best bet.

Either way. although theses devices look, and are incredibly easy to use, there are many circumstances in which their readings may be wrong.   Some of theses things (like cold hands) you can fix, others you cannot (carbon monoxide in your blood).   Please read the information portions of this article whichever device you choose.   Knowledge really is power.   I want you to be empowered to take control of your health.   An oximeter may help you greatly.   Use it wisely.

Andrea D BSN-RN

Andrea D BSN-RN

Andrea D is a registered nurse who has spent over a decade providing hands on care and education for seniors and their loved ones in multiple care settings as well as in both metropolitan and rural areas.

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